Fire in Pacific Northwest Forests: Past, Present, and Future

A Four-Part Webinar Series

Fire is elemental, fire is powerful, and fire certainly can and does destroy homes.

But does fire actually destroy our forests?

Please join Great Old Broads for Wilderness for a highly-informative, four-part virtual educational series—”Fire in Pacific Northwest Forests: Past, Present, and Future.” These Zoom-based sessions—featuring expert forest and wildfire scientists and practitioners, and hosted by the Rogue Valley, Cascade Volcanoes, Willamette Valley, and Central Oregon Bitterbrush Broadbands—will take a closer look at the historical role of fire in the Pacific Northwest’s forested landscapes, and how that role has changed with human management.

Participants are encouraged but not required to sign up for all four sessions.

 

Session #1—Fire in the Forest: A Natural Process and Unnatural Changes

NOTE: REGISTRATION CLOSED—SESSION IS FULL!

You can still watch this presentation live on our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/greatoldbroads

March 2, 6:00-7:30 p.m. Pacific

Learn about the natural role that fires play in forested landscapes and ecosystems in the region, and how climate change and human management has altered those roles, from the use of fire by indigenous people, to systematic fire suppression. 

Presenters:

Jessica Halofsky, Ph.D. —Research scientist, University of Washington, School of Environmental and Forest Sciences and U.S. Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station.

Dr. Jessica Halofsky

Dr. Jessica Halofsky

Dr. Halofsky is a research ecologist with ten years of experience in climate change science and applications. She received an M.S. in Forest Resources from Penn State, and a Ph.D. in Forest Science from Oregon State University. Her research interests include fire and disturbance ecology, vegetation dynamics, and climate change impacts and adaptation. Recently, she has also collaborated on a number of model- based projects focused on potential shifts in fire regimes and vegetation dynamics with climate change. Dr. Halofsky has worked closely with scientists and managers on climate change vulnerability assessment and adaptation projects for years, pioneering one of the first climate change vulnerability assessment and adaptation projects with Olympic National Forest and Park.

 

 

 

Darlene Chirman, Ecologist and activist.

Darlene Chirman

Darlene Chirman

Darlene is member of the Great Old Broads Cascade-Volcano Broadband in Portland and Southern Washington. She is a transplant from California, where she earned a Masters in Ecology from the University of California at Davis. She then spent 20 years doing habitat restoration in the Santa Barbara, CA area. She retired to Portland where her daughter lives, and spends her time as a habitat restoration volunteer and as an advocate for forest protection and climate action, and the intersection between those two issues. She has a special interest in wildfire in forest ecosystems and community wildfire recovery, having evacuated from her Santa Barbara home several times, and the loss of half her neighborhood there to wildfire in 1990.

Session #2—When the Smoke Clears: Natural Regeneration and Post-Fire Management in Our Forests

March 9, 6:00-7:30 p.m. Pacific

Explore how fires lead to natural regeneration of forests, how human management after a fire impacts this process, and what implications this has for biodiversity, natural ecosystems, and our climate.
 
Presenters:

Monica L. Bond, Ph.D.—Wildlife biologist, biodiversity activist & principal scientist for Wild Nature Institute.

Dr. Monica Bond

Dr. Monica Bond

Dr. Bond is a wildlife biologist with over two decades of experience studying ecosystems across the globe. She received a M.S. in Wildlife Science from Oregon State University, and her Ph.D. in Ecology the University of Zürich in Switzerland. Her research interests include the sociality and demography of giraffes in Tanzania, spatial and temporal abundance and distribution of ungulates in a fragmented ecosystem of Tanzania, fire ecology of Spotted Owls & Black-backed Woodpeckers in California, and space use by small mammals in western grasslands. She is a member of The Wildlife Society (Certified Wildlife Biologist), The Association for Fire Ecology, Wildlife Disease Association, Ecological Society of America, and the Society for Conservation Biology.

 

 

 

Francis Eatherington, activist.

Francis Eatherington

Francis Eatherington

Francis Eatherington—Francis is a dedicated member of Great Old Broads for Wilderness’ Rogue Valley Broadband in Southwest Oregon and a strong voice for public lands conservation. She has lived in the Umpqua River valley for almost 50 years, and worked in forestry in the Pacific Northwest for 25 years. Francis also worked with Umpqua Watersheds and Cascadia Wildlands to help protect public land forests in the Umpqua watershed. More recently, she’s been fighting the Jordan Cove Liquified Natural Gas pipeline and terminal proposal with her fellow Oregon Broads.

 

 

 

Darlene Chirman, Ecologist and activist.

Darlene Chirman

Darlene Chirman

Darlene is member of the Great Old Broads Cascade-Volcano Broadband in Portland and Southern Washington. She is a transplant from California, where she earned a Masters in Ecology from the University of California at Davis. She then spent 20 years doing habitat restoration in the Santa Barbara, CA area. She retired to Portland where her daughter lives, and spends her time as a habitat restoration volunteer and as an advocate for forest protection and climate action, and the intersection between those two issues. She has a special interest in wildfire in forest ecosystems and community wildfire recovery, having evacuated from her Santa Barbara home several times, and the loss of half her neighborhood there to wildfire in 1990.

Session #3—Adapting to a Future with Fire: Preparing Our Communities and Our Landscapes

March 23, 6:00-7:30 p.m. Pacific

Fire is a reality, now and into the future, so how do we live with it? We’ll take a look at ways communities can adapt to live with and prepare for fire through firewise landscapes and other measures, and explore the future of fire on the landscape in an era of climate change.

Presenters:

Aaron Mendez, student and activist.

Aaron Mendez

Aaron Mendez

Aaron is currently a 2nd year student studying Civil Engineering at Oregon State University. He was raised his whole life in Phoenix, Oregon and graduated from Phoenix High School in 2019. His parents have strong ties within the entire Phoenix-Talent Community, with his dad working for the Phoenix Public Works Department and his mom being a teacher at Talent Elementary. He is the oldest of three boys and both of his parents immigrated to the United States from Mexico.

 

 

 

 

Darlene Chirman, Ecologist and Actvist

Darlene Chirman

Darlene Chirman

Darlene is member of the Great Old Broads Cascade-Volcano Broadband in Portland and Southern Washington. She is a transplant from California, where she earned a Masters in Ecology from the University of California at Davis. She then spent 20 years doing habitat restoration in the Santa Barbara, CA area. She retired to Portland where her daughter lives, and spends her time as a habitat restoration volunteer and as an advocate for forest protection and climate action, and the intersection between those two issues. She has a special interest in wildfire in forest ecosystems and community wildfire recovery, having evacuated from her Santa Barbara home several times, and the loss of half her neighborhood there to wildfire in 1990.

Session #4—Putting Fire Knowledge into Action: Advocating for Forests and Fire Policy

April 6, 6:00-7:30 p.m. Pacific

You have a voice in wildfire management policies. Learn how to get involved and become an advocate and protect your forests through management planning and the public process.

Presenters:

Brenna Bell, staff attorney and NEPA coordinator for Bark.

Brenna Bell

Brenna brings to her work a lifetime of passion for the Pacific Northwest, twenty-five years of organizing experience, and an extensive background in environmental law and education. Her involvement with Cascadia Forest Alliance and the direct-action campaign to save Eagle Creek led her to Lewis & Clark Law School, from which she graduated in 2001. Brenna has worked with numerous Oregon non-profits, including Klamath Siskiyou Wildlands Center, Willamette Riverkeeper and Tryon Life Community Farm.For the past 10 years, she has worked with Bark, protecting and restoring Mt. Hood National Forest as their policy coordinator and staff attorney.

 

 

 

Darlene Chirman, Ecologist and activist.

Darlene Chirman

Darlene Chirman

Darlene is member of the Great Old Broads Cascade-Volcano Broadband in Portland and Southern Washington. She is a transplant from California, where she earned a Masters in Ecology from the University of California at Davis. She then spent 20 years doing habitat restoration in the Santa Barbara, CA area. She retired to Portland where her daughter lives, and spends her time as a habitat restoration volunteer and as an advocate for forest protection and climate action, and the intersection between those two issues. She has a special interest in wildfire in forest ecosystems and community wildfire recovery, having evacuated from her Santa Barbara home several times, and the loss of half her neighborhood there to wildfire in 1990.

These sessions are free and open to all. Space is limited so register today!

If you are able, Great Old Broads for Wilderness kindly asks for a suggested $10 donation to support our continued on-the-ground grassroots advocacy work.
Are you or someone you know interested in watching a recap of the web session highlights in Spanish? A translated video of highlights from each webinar will be available in April, so stay tuned or contact katya@greatoldbroads.org directly for further information.
 
¿Está usted o un amigo interesado en ver una recapitulación de puntos culminantes del seminario web en español? Una traducción de los puntos culminantes del seminario web estará disponible en el mes de abril. Quédese vigilante o se puede comunicar directamente con katya@greatoldbroads.com para más información.