Nov. 16—Webinar: Conversations on Cooperative Management Practices on Public Lands

Conversations on Cooperative Management Practices on Public Lands

Wednesday, November 16, 5:00 pm (Mountain)

Long before the creation of national parks, monuments and wildlife refuges, Indigenous people lived and cared for these lands for tens of thousands of years, acquiring an intimate knowledge of plants, animals, and ecosystems. This knowledge, passed down through generations, could be invaluable to mitigating the worsening climate change and biodiversity crisis. A major step forward for public lands across the nation has been the move toward cooperative management policies between the federal government and Tribal and Indigenous groups at places like Bears Ears National Monument. But what does substantive, meaningful, and timely engagement with Tribes look like? How can we incorporate Indigenous knowledge and voices into conservation and public land decisions? 

Join us for a special webinar on Wednesday, Nov. 16th at 5:00 pm (Mountain) where—using Bears Ears National Monument as an example—we will discuss what Tribal co-management is, how it is beneficial for public lands and Indigenous people, and how to advocate for co-management in land planning and conservation.

Presenters include:

Regina-Lopez-Whiteskunk-Crop

Regina Lopez-Whiteskunk

Regina Lopez-Whiteskunk was born and raised in southwestern Colorado and resides on the Ute Mountain Ute reservation, where she is an enrolled member of the Ute Mountain Ute Tribe. Regina has served on the Ute Mountain Ute Tribal Council, and is a former co-chair for the Bears Ears Intertribal Coalition. Regina was recently appointed as the Chair of the Bears Ears Monument Advisory Committee by Department of Interior Secretary Deb Haaland.

Angelo-Baca-Crop

Angelo Baca

Angelo Baca is from the Navajo and Hopi nations, which are tribal nations located within their aboriginal territory in the southwest region of the United States. He served as the Cultural Resources Coordinator for Utah Diné Bikéyah, a non-profit that engages with local Native community members to protect their traditional cultures and ancestral lands. Angelo is currently a member of the Bears Ears Monument Advisory Committee.

JakePalma_Crop

Jake Palma

Jake Palma is the Bureau of Land Management’s Field Manager in Montecello, Utah, where he is responsible for the administration of more than 1.8 million surface acres in San Juan County, Utah—including Bears Ears National Monument. 

Charissa Miijessepe-Wilson

Charissa Miijessepe-Wilson

Charissa Miijessepe-Wilson, a member of the Prairie Band Potawatomi Tribe in Northeast, Kansas, is Co-Director of the Bears Ears Inter-Tribal Coalition—where she manages Tribal Leadership directives and daily operations, leads Strategic Planning and Visioning, and oversees the ramp up and creation of the Bears Ears Commission.

For more information and to register, click below!

2022-11-16 17:00 2022-11-16 00:00 America/Denver Nov. 16—Webinar: Conversations on Cooperative Management Practices on Public Lands Conversations on Cooperative Management Practices on Public Lands Wednesday, November 16, 5:00 pm (Mountain) Long before the creation of national parks, monuments and wildlife refuges, Indigenous people lived and cared for these lands for tens of thousands of years, acquiring an intimate knowledge of plants, animals, and ecosystems. This knowledge, passed down through generations, could [...] susan@greatoldbroads.org